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Immigration Pushed To The Forefront Again.... Thanks! To Everyone Who Has Propelled This Issue To Its' Rightful Position. Years Of Hard Work Are Paying Off.....Keep Up The Good Work!......
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Old 11-13-2010, 11:14 AM
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ilbegone ilbegone is offline
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Default Immigration Court.

We hear a lot about what ICE, Obama, Congress, and all the rest are or are not doing about illegal immigration.

An article in the Orange County Register states that about 63% of cases turned over to the court by ICE are not subsequently deported.

****
Links to that story:

http://saveourstate.info/showthread....3191#post13191

http://www.ocregister.com/news/repor...ation-ice.html
****


Who are these people, how do they gain their office, and can they be removed if they are actually obstructing the the law? Is ICE doing enough to provide the courts with information relative to win a deportation case? How are these cases managed?

What is the curve? Do certain judges deny most cases that come before them, while others mostly rubber stamp the proceedings? Or is the percentage about equal among the judges decisions?
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SOMETIMES IT JUST DOESN'T MAKE SENSE.

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Last edited by ilbegone; 11-13-2010 at 11:32 AM.
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Old 11-13-2010, 11:16 AM
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Los Angeles Immigration Court Address:

EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW
Immigration Court
606 S. Olive Street, 15th Floor
Los Angeles, California 90014

Telephone Number:

(213)894-2811

Directions to the court:

The Los Angeles Immigration Court is located at 606 S. Olive Street, at the southeast corner of 6th Street and Olive Street in downtown Los Angeles, south of Pershing Square park. From the Harbor Freeway, #110, take the 6th Street off ramp and go east on 6th Street to Olive Street. For your convenience, we have also provided a link to a free mapping service.

Upon entering the building, take the elevators on the south end of the lobby to the 15th floor where the daily calendars are posted and the information window is located. The courtrooms are located on the 5th,14th, 16th, 17th and 18th floors. The north end elevators serve the 5th floor.

Court Hours:

The Los Angeles Immigration Court is open 7:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The information window is open for filings and other matters from 7:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Hearings commence at 8:00 or 8:30 a.m. each morning and 12:30 or 1:00 p.m. each afternoon.

***

Immigration Judges:


Anderson, David C.
Bank, Ira E.
Bakke Varzandeh, Joyce
Bass, Lori
Bither, Christine A.
Bronzina, Isabel A.
Dunkel-Bradley, Dorothy
Fong, Thomas Y.K.
Giattina, Anthony T.
Ho, Anna
Latimore, Jan D.
Little, Monica
Munoz, Lorraine J.
Naselow-Nahas, Tara
Parchert, Brett M.
Peters, Rose C.
Riley, Kevin
Rodriquez de Jongh, Lourdes
Rooyani, Rodin
Sholomson, Stephen L.
Sitgraves, D.D.
Stancill, Christine E.
Tabaddor, A. Ashley
Travieso, Frank
Vahid-Tehrani, Gita
Walsh, John F.
Walton, Richard D.

***

Immigration court practice manual http://www.justice.gov/eoir/vll/OCIJ...ocij_page1.htm

***

LIST OF FREE LEGAL SERVICES PROVIDERS

The following organizations and attorneys provide free legal services and/or referrals for such services to indigent individuals in immigration removal proceedings, pursuant to 8 CFR §1003.61. Some of these organizations may also charge a nominal fee for legal services to certain low income individuals. http://www.justice.gov/eoir/probono/freelglchtCA.htm

***

Court Administrator and Court Staff:

Stephen P. Perkins
Court Administrator

Jeanette Patron
Deputy Court Administrator
(Hearings Unit)

Daisy Berrero
Deputy Court Administrator
(Intake and Post-Hearings Units)

Ana Chavez
Staff Assistant to ACIJ Thomas Y.K. Fong

Sharon Kok
Administrative Support Assistant

David Quiñones
Clerk

Attorney Advisors
Walter Bocchini
Melissa Lott
Christina J. Martin
Robert M. Stalzer


Judicial Law Clerks
Stephen Chapman
Sarah Dooley
Emilie Faris
Rebekah Nahas


Post Hearing Unit
Michel Morrow, Supervisor
Victoria Amara
Susan Greenbaum
Vince Ordonez

Cynthia Reed
Vera Washington

Records (Reception) Unit

Claudia Romero, Supervisor

Reem Alberre

Bhavin Patel

Jess Patino

Arcelia Segovia

Nicole Urista

5th Floor Hearings Unit
Maribel Garcia, Supervisor
Gohar Beloryan
Leticia Regis
Connie Turingan

Neyra Zavala

14th Floor Hearings Unit
Linda Johnson, Supervisor
Charlotte Brown
Pamela Campbell
Claudio Escoto
Loida Manago
Yelba Reyes
Felipe Romero
Maria Sanchez

16th Floor Hearings Unit
Marisol Berumen, Supervisor
Esther Castañeda
Janet Chavez
Nora Covarrubias
Marissa Gray
Ingrid Knight
Jan Lee
Terry Lim
Dorina Meihi

17th Floor Hearings Unit
Kathy Cole-Smith, Supervisor
Travis Dawson
Marissa Gray
Cynthia Jaojoco
Rene Lamar
Erica Martinez
Gohar Beloryan
Danielle Owens
Mark Perdew
Kim Wooten-Daley

Interpreters
Rene Cervantes, Supervisor
Hilma Loreto, Supervisor

Alcira Argueta

Ana Benko

Mary Frausto

Marina Hassannali

Flor Lopez

Yolanda Martinez-Villaseñor

Margarita Menjivar

Linda Orozco

Adelayda Sarmiento

Gina Snell

Anna B. Torres

Luis Vasquez

Myriam Vijil

***

Fees

Where to pay the fee with DHS for applications to be filed with the Los Angeles Immigration Court:

For motions to re-open and motions to re-consider before the Court:
Go to the DHS at the Federal Building, 300 N. Los Angeles Street, Room 1001. Take your appeal. You may have to wait in line to pay the fee on the motion so it is recommended that you pay the fee well in advance of the expiration date for filing such motions. Take your motion and fee receipt to the Los Angeles Immigration Court and file it at the reception window on the 15th floor.

For all other applications filed with the court, except Defensive Asylum, form I-
589 (Form(s) I-485, I-191, I-601, I-602, I-881, EOIR-40, EOIR-42A, or EOIR-42B)
In addition to filing your application(s) with the Immigration Court and serving a
complete copy of any such application(s) on the appropriate Immigration and
Customs Enforcement (ICE) Office of Chief Counsel, you must also complete the
following requirements before the Immigration Judge can grant relief in your case:

SEND these 5 items to the address below:
(1) A clear copy of the entire application form(s) that you will be filing or have filed with the Immigration Court. (Do not submit any documents such as attachments – send only the completed form itself),
(2) The appropriate application fee(s) or the Immigration Judge’s order granting your fee waiver. (The fee can be found in the instructions with the application, the regulations, and at www.uscis.gov or for the EOIR forms, at www.usdoj.gov/eoir),
(3) The mandatory $80 USCIS biometrics fee,
(4) A copy of Form EOIR–28 (Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Representative Before the Immigration Court) if you are represented, and
(5) A copy of these instructions.

USCIS Texas Service Center
P.O. Box 852463
Mesquite, Texas 75185-2463

All fees must be submitted in the form of a check or a money order (or separate checks/money orders) and be made out to: “Department of Homeland Security.”

After the 5 items are received at the USCIS Texas Service Center, you will receive: A USCIS fee receipt notice showing that you have paid the application fee (unless waived) and the mandatory biometrics fee. Keep a copy for yourself.

A USCIS notice with instructions to appear for an appointment at a nearby Application Support Center (ASC) for collection of your biometrics (such as your photographs, fingerprints, and signature). This notice contains your important USCIS application receipt number which must be presented to the ASC. Your dependents will receive separate ASC notices if they are required to provide biometrics. If you do not receive this notice in 3 weeks, call (800) 375-5283. If you also apply for asylum, take both scheduling notices to your ASC appointment (see side A). Keep copies of all ASC scheduling notices for your records.

You (and your dependents) must then:
# Attend this ASC biometrics appointment and obtain a biometrics confirmation document from the ASC,
# File the following with the Immigration Court within the time period directed by the Immigration Judge: (1) the original application Form, (2) all supporting documentation, and (3) the USCIS fee receipt notice that serves as evidence that you paid the filing fees (unless the Immigration Judge granted you an application fee waiver), and
# Retain your ASC biometrics confirmation as proof that your biometrics were taken, and bring it to your future Immigration Court hearings.

DO NOT SUBMIT THE ORIGINAL APPLICATION TO USCIS. DO NOT SUBMIT ANY APPLICATIONS TO THIS POST OFFICE BOX OTHER THAN THOSE APPLICATIONS LISTED. ALL OTHER APPLICATIONS, INCLUDING APPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT AUTHORIZATION AND IMMIGRANT PETITIONS, WILL BE RETURNED TO YOU IF SENT TO THIS POST OFFICE BOX. FOR SUBMITTING APPLICATIONS NOT LISTED ON SIDE A OR SIDE B OF THIS PAPER, PLEASE FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS THAT ACCOMPANY THE APPLICATION.
For all I-589 defensive applications being filed in the court:
Please note: There is no fee for filing the application but a biometrics fee must be paid. Please follow the instructions below:

In addition to filing your application and supporting documents with the Immigration Court and serving a complete copy of your application on the appropriate Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Office of Chief Counsel, you must also complete the following requirements before the Immigration Judge can grant relief or protection in your case:

SEND these 3 items to the address below:

(1) A clear copy of the first three pages of your completed Form I-589 (Application for Asylum and for Withholding of Removal) that you will be filing or have filed with the Immigration Court, which must include your full name, your current mailing address, and your alien number (A-number). (Do not submit any documents other than the first three pages of the completed I-589),
(2) A copy of Form EOIR–28 (Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Representative Before the Immigration Court) if you are represented, and
(3) A copy of these instructions.

USCIS Nebraska Service Center
Defensive Asylum Application With Immigration Court
P.O. Box 87589
Lincoln, NE 68501-7589

After the 3 items are received at the USCIS Nebraska Service Center, you will receive:

• A USCIS receipt notice in the mail indicating that USCIS has received your asylum application, and

• An ASC notice for you, and separate Application Support Center (ASC) notices for each dependent included in your application. Each ASC notice will indicate the individual’s unique receipt number and will provide instructions for each person to appear for an appointment at a nearby ASC for collection of biometrics (such as your photograph, fingerprints, and signature). If you do not receive this notice in 3 weeks, call (800) 375-5283. If you also mail applications under Instructions B, you will receive 2 notices with different receipt numbers. You must wait for and take both scheduling notices to your ASC appointment.

You (and your dependents) must then:
• Attend the biometrics appointment at the ASC, and obtain a biometrics confirmation document before leaving the ASC, and
• Retain your ASC biometrics confirmation as proof that your biometrics were taken, and bring it to your future Immigration Court hearings.
__________________
Freibier gab's gestern

Hay burros en el maiz

RAP IS TO MUSIC WHAT ETCH-A-SKETCH IS TO ART

Don't drink and post.

"A nickel will get you on the subway, but garlic will get you a seat." - Old New York Yiddish Saying

"You can observe a lot just by watching." Yogi Berra

Old journeyman commenting on young apprentices - "Think about it, these are their old days"

SOMETIMES IT JUST DOESN'T MAKE SENSE.

Never, ever, wear a bright colored shirt to a stand up comedy show.


Last edited by ilbegone; 11-13-2010 at 11:43 AM.
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Old 11-13-2010, 12:32 PM
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This article dated 6-11-2007 seems to have some political bias of it's own, but it has some important information concerning Immigration judges:




Immigration Judges Often Picked Based On GOP Ties

Law Forbids Practice; Courts Being Reshaped

By Amy Goldstein and Dan Eggen
Washington Post Staff Writers
Monday, June 11, 2007

The Bush administration increasingly emphasized partisan political ties over expertise in recent years in selecting the judges who decide the fate of hundreds of thousands of immigrants, despite laws that preclude such considerations, according to an analysis by The Washington Post.

At least one-third of the immigration judges appointed by the Justice Department since 2004 have had Republican connections or have been administration insiders, and half lacked experience in immigration law, Justice Department, immigration court and other records show.

Two newly appointed immigration judges were failed candidates for the U.S. Tax Court nominated by President Bush; one fudged his taxes and the other was deemed unqualified to be a tax judge by the nation's largest association of lawyers. Both were Republican loyalists.

Justice officials also gave immigration judgeships to a New Jersey election law specialist who represented GOP candidates, a former treasurer of the Louisiana Republican Party, a White House domestic policy adviser and a conservative crusader against pornography.
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These appointments, all made by the attorney general, have begun to reshape a system of courts in which judges, ruling alone, exercise broad powers -- deporting each year nearly a quarter-million immigrants, who have limited rights to appeal and no right to an attorney. The judges do not serve fixed terms.

Department officials say they changed their hiring practices in April but defend their selections. Still, the injection of political considerations into the selection of immigration judges has attracted congressional attention in the wake of controversy over the Bush administration's dismissal last year of nine U.S. attorneys.

The Post analysis is the first systematic examination of the people appointed to immigration courts, the relationships that led to their selection and the experience they brought to their position. The review, based on Justice records and research into the judges' backgrounds, encompassed the 37 current judges approved by Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales or his predecessor, John D. Ashcroft, starting in 2004.

That year is when the Justice Department began to jettison the civil service process that traditionally guided the selections in favor of political considerations, according to sworn congressional testimony by one senior department official and a statement by the lawyer for another official.


Those two officials, D. Kyle Sampson and Monica M. Goodling, have said they were told the practice was legal. But Justice spokesman Dean Boyd said that immigration judges are considered civil service employees who may not be chosen based on political factors, unlike judges in federal criminal courts.

All the judges appointed during this period who arrived with experience in immigration law were prosecutors or held other immigration enforcement jobs. That was a reversal of a trend during the Clinton administration in which the Justice Department sought to balance such appointees with ones who had been attorneys representing immigrants, according to current and former immigration judges.

Boyd said in a written statement that judges appointed during the Bush administration are "well qualified for their current positions" and that "outstanding immigration judges can come from diverse backgrounds." Boyd also said that race and ethnicity are not factors in hiring but cited statistics showing that immigration courts are "considerably more diverse" than other kinds of courts.


The department launched a new hiring program in April that requires public announcements of open positions and detailed evaluations and interviews, with a final decision still in the hands of the attorney general. The action came partly in response to a lawsuit by a veteran immigration counsel who alleged discrimination when she was passed over for two judgeships.

Some judges and other immigration experts are highly critical of the administration's practice of placing political allies on the courts. "When we start seeing people who look like [they're fulfilling] someone's political debt get these positions, it starts to become disturbing," said Crystal Williams, a deputy director of the American Immigration Lawyers Association.

"Immigration law is very complex," said Denise Slavin, an immigration judge since 1995 in Miami, who is president of the National Association of Immigration Judges, a union. "So generally speaking, it's very good to have someone coming into this area with [an] immigration background. It's very difficult, for those who don't, to catch up."

Mike Hethmon, general counsel of the Immigration Reform Law Institute, which advocates stricter border policies, said, however, that a strong legal background is more important than immigration experience. "The qualities of a good adjudicator don't necessarily focus on the subject matter," he said.

Since Sept. 11, 2001, the Bush administration has said it is employing the nation's 54 immigration courts, with 226 judges, as a central tool of its anti-terrorism policies, using them to deport hundreds of noncitizens who were detained as terrorism suspects but were not charged with crimes.
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In 2002, it created stiffer guidelines for appeals and wrote new rules sharply reducing the number of judges who hear them, partly to reduce a large case backlog. That has made it harder for people deemed unwanted by the government to stay in the country.

The infusion of politics into the selection of judges began in the midst of this transformation of the court system. Sampson and Goodling, who participated in the prosecutor firings, did not say which immigration judges had been selected for their political leanings. But records and interviews reveal the Republican ties of many.

One was Glen L. Bower, whom Bush initially nominated to the tax court. He was never confirmed because lawmakers noted that his amended tax returns showed he had taken inappropriate deductions for entertainment, gifts and meals for three consecutive years. A former Republican state legislator, Bower was the revenue director to then-Illinois Gov. George H. Ryan (R), who would be convicted on racketeering and fraud charges.

A few months earlier, another failed tax court nominee, Francis L. Cramer, a former campaign treasurer for Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.), was appointed as an immigration judge. Cramer's bid for a seat on the tax court foundered after the American Bar Association's taxation section wrote a rare letter to the Senate Finance Committee, saying: "We are unable to conclude that he is qualified to serve."

Cramer was then hired by the Justice Department's tax division and was briefly lent to the department's Office of Immigration Litigation. Ashcroft approved him as an immigration judge in March 2004. The Government Accountability Office, a legislative watchdog, criticized the appointment, saying, "Converting a Schedule C [political] appointee with less than 6 months of immigration law experience to an immigration judge position raises questions about the fairness of the conversion."

Another politically connected lawyer, Garry D. Malphrus, was appointed to Arlington's immigration court in 2005. He had been associate director of the White House Domestic Policy Council and, before that, a Republican aide on two Senate Judiciary Committee subcommittees.

During the Florida recount after the 2000 presidential election that brought Bush to office, Malphrus took part in the "Brooks Brothers riot" -- when GOP staffers from Washington chanted "stop the fraud" at Miami's polling headquarters.

Other appointed Republican loyalists include lawyer Dorothy A. Harbeck, who represented New Jersey's last GOP candidate for governor; Mark H. Metcalf, an unsuccessful Republican candidate for the state Senate and U.S. Congress from Kentucky who went on to several positions at the Justice Department unrelated to immigration; and Chris A. Brisack, a former Texas county GOP chairman who had been named by Bush, the governor at the time, to the state's Library and Archives Commission.

Bruce A. Taylor, who was appointed as an immigration judge in Arizona last year, was general counsel for two conservative anti-pornography groups, Citizens for Decency Through Law and the National Law Center for Children and Families. Taylor also worked as a senior counsel in the Criminal Division at the Justice Department, but his résumé does not indicate immigration-related experience.

Like other immigration judges contacted last week, Taylor declined to comment. He said the Executive Office for Immigration Review, which oversees immigration courts, had instructed immigration judges to refer questions to the main office in Falls Church. A spokeswoman there referred questions to Justice headquarters.

The recent pattern of hiring for immigration judges provoked a 2005 lawsuit by the government's chief immigration lawyer in El Paso for 22 years. Guadalupe Gonzales -- no relation to the attorney general -- alleged she was denied a judgeship twice in favor of less-qualified white men who were hired without an open application process.

Her suit alleged that, between 2001 and late 2005, only two Latinos were appointed nationwide as immigration judges. Justice Department records make clear that the immigration bench is overwhelmingly male and white, even though Spanish-speaking people from Latin America make up at least 70 percent of the caseload.


The Justice Department responded in court papers that Gonzales's lawsuit should be thrown out; it argued that she had not identified a discriminatory practice and that immigration judges did not have be hired as part of a competitive process. It said that all but four immigration judges chosen during the period in contention -- from late 2003 to 2006 -- were hired without public competition.

In September, Judge Emmet G. Sullivan of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled against the department, finding that Gonzales "had identified a particular policy that has a discriminatory effect on a particular group." Sullivan said that one judge hired in El Paso did not meet the minimum qualifications for the job. Neither, the judge said, had Gonzales's level of experience.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...1001229_2.html
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Hay burros en el maiz

RAP IS TO MUSIC WHAT ETCH-A-SKETCH IS TO ART

Don't drink and post.

"A nickel will get you on the subway, but garlic will get you a seat." - Old New York Yiddish Saying

"You can observe a lot just by watching." Yogi Berra

Old journeyman commenting on young apprentices - "Think about it, these are their old days"

SOMETIMES IT JUST DOESN'T MAKE SENSE.

Never, ever, wear a bright colored shirt to a stand up comedy show.


Last edited by ilbegone; 11-13-2010 at 12:43 PM.
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Old 11-13-2010, 12:57 PM
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I haven't had time to read this one through, I believe there may be some bias in it, but I also believe it has loads of info.

A large PDF report by the American Bar Association titled Reforming the Immigration System

http://www.abanet.org/media/nosearch...ary_012510.pdf

A summary of the report http://www.abanet.org/abanet/media/r...?releaseid=870
__________________
Freibier gab's gestern

Hay burros en el maiz

RAP IS TO MUSIC WHAT ETCH-A-SKETCH IS TO ART

Don't drink and post.

"A nickel will get you on the subway, but garlic will get you a seat." - Old New York Yiddish Saying

"You can observe a lot just by watching." Yogi Berra

Old journeyman commenting on young apprentices - "Think about it, these are their old days"

SOMETIMES IT JUST DOESN'T MAKE SENSE.

Never, ever, wear a bright colored shirt to a stand up comedy show.


Last edited by ilbegone; 11-13-2010 at 01:08 PM.
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Old 11-13-2010, 01:29 PM
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ilbegone ilbegone is offline
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Immigration Judge removed for being an A-hole:

Quote:
Ferlise's removal -- and it is unclear if or when he will be returned -- comes upon the heels of what one reporter called a "sharply worded" communication from Attorney General Alberto Gonzales to immigration judges regarding their performance. http://cgrs.uchastings.edu/newslette...6/summer06.htm

From another large PDF report titled Crisis on the Immigration Bench

It has a lot of info too.

Quote:

In contrast, immigration judges are appointed by the
Attorney General and act under his control and supervision.35
Immigration judges traditionally are individuals with
immigration law expertise, who are chosen through a
competitive civil service process.36 Those applying for the
positions are vetted by EOIR, and EOIR’s recommendations
are forwarded to the Office of the Deputy Attorney General,
where they are usually approved.37 Contrary to the procedure
for federal judges, the appointment process for immigration
judges is not subject to a broad system of checks and balances;
rather, the Executive Branch alone is responsible for the
appointment of immigration judges. Unlike administrative law
judges, immigration judges historically have not been required
to pass a competitive exam to be appointed to the bench.38

***

E. Current Disciplinary Procedures for Immigration Judges
Neither the BIA nor the courts of appeal are designed to
monitor complaints of ethical misconduct in immigration
courts. In 2003 the EOIR Director established a procedure for
evaluating behavioral complaints against immigration judges.78
Under this system, EOIR and the Office of the Chief
Immigration Judge are responsible for monitoring complaints,
and complaint reports are “generated on a monthly basis for
internal use only.”79 The reports are sent to the EOIR Director,
and are intended to provide a “centralized and comprehensive
compilation of written and oral complaints” regarding
immigration judges’ conduct on the bench, as well as the status
of the complaints.80 Pursuant to this structure, the EOIR
Director has the responsibility to monitor the pattern...

http://www.brooklaw.edu/~/media/PDF/...blr_v73ii.ashx
__________________
Freibier gab's gestern

Hay burros en el maiz

RAP IS TO MUSIC WHAT ETCH-A-SKETCH IS TO ART

Don't drink and post.

"A nickel will get you on the subway, but garlic will get you a seat." - Old New York Yiddish Saying

"You can observe a lot just by watching." Yogi Berra

Old journeyman commenting on young apprentices - "Think about it, these are their old days"

SOMETIMES IT JUST DOESN'T MAKE SENSE.

Never, ever, wear a bright colored shirt to a stand up comedy show.

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Old 11-13-2010, 06:26 PM
Rim05 Rim05 is offline
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Sounds like a lot of good reading, I think it will take me a week to get through it but I will try.
Thanks for posting the info.
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