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Old 02-24-2010, 05:19 PM
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Jeanfromfillmore Jeanfromfillmore is offline
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Default Poll: More than half of Hispanics identify as conservative

Poll: More than half of Hispanics identify as conservative
09:05 AM CST on Wednesday, February 24, 2010
By ROBERT T. GARRETT / The Dallas Morning News
rtgarrett@dallasnews.com
AUSTIN A bent to conservatism and family makes Hispanics a promising pool of votes for Republicans, but the party's targeting of illegal immigrants has withered its attraction.
Regardless, Gov. Rick Perry has fared relatively well, perhaps because of his anti-Washington rhetoric and his careful immigration stance, a recent poll indicates.
It shows more than half of Texas Hispanics call themselves conservative, and a surprising 23 percent say they might participate in Tuesday's GOP primary. Among those, Perry leads Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison by 2 to 1, according to the poll, commissioned by an Austin consultant for a national group of Hispanic legislative leaders.
Sen. Leticia Van de Putte, D-San Antonio, said the poll hints at a little-noticed facet of Perry's political persona: He doesn't frighten Hispanics because he often visits their communities, and he distances himself from immigration hard-liners in the GOP.
"He thought the border wall was a little ridiculous and didn't think it was going to help," said Van de Putte, Democrats' leader in the Senate and a co-chairwoman of the Democratic National Convention in Denver two years ago. "What he wanted to keep out were those people that are smuggling drugs and people."
Van de Putte said Perry tilts more to the right than his predecessor, George W. Bush, and can't match Bush's high level of support among Hispanics. But she said many Hispanics remember that Perry signed a 2001 bill that let illegal immigrants pay in-state tuition at public colleges. He has defended the bill, saying affected students have studied hard in Texas schools and will be good citizens.
"That kind of inoculated him a little bit," she said. She added: "Rick Perry is a tremendous retail campaigner."
Some political demographers remain skeptical that more than a smattering of Hispanics will cast GOP ballots next week or that Perry will capture much beyond token support among Latinos in the primary or November's election.
Lydia Camarillo, vice president of the nonpartisan Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, said exit polls in recent governor's races show Perry captured far less of the Hispanic vote than the 39 percent that Bush grabbed in 1998 against Land Commissioner Garry Mauro, a Democrat.
Perry attracted only 13 percent of Hispanic votes cast in his 2002 general election showdown with Laredo banker Tony Sanchez, according to exit polls by the William C. Velasquez Institute, a think tank affiliated with Camarillo's group.
Four years ago, Perry won just 14 percent of Hispanic votes cast, compared with 40 percent for Democrat Chris Bell and 29 percent for independent Carole Keeton Strayhorn, exit polls showed.
With both Perry and Hutchison stressing a lean state government and low taxes, Camarillo said, it's hard to see many Hispanics breaking for the GOP nominee this year.
Differing definitions
The poll found that only 18 percent of Texas Hispanics say they're liberal or progressive, while 54 percent say they're conservative, moderate conservative or religiously conservative.
But Camarillo said many Hispanics who identify themselves as conservative aren't talking about "less taxes, less government," the way white conservatives would.
"When a Latino says that he or she is conservative, they're thinking about how they are raising the kids and ... the family," she said. "It's more about work ethic, and that when you give your word, you give your word. Those kinds of things are what they're thinking of. It's a different frame of mind, and pollsters have yet to define it."
Demographer Dan Weiser pointed to voter turnout in recent Dallas County elections and said that despite the poll's findings, Perry can hope for relatively little Hispanic support.
In the hotly contested 2008 presidential primary in Dallas County, 91 percent of Hispanics who participated cast a Democratic ballot, he said. Weiser, a longtime student of Dallas politics, projects countywide turnout among minorities by studying key precincts dominated by blacks or Hispanics.
He said that while almost 300,000 voters participated in Dallas County's presidential primary two years ago, only 12 percent were Hispanics. Of about 92,000 voters in the county's last GOP presidential primary, only 4 percent were Hispanics, Weiser said.
"Each time you think there will be a real increase in Hispanic votes, I don't find it," he said.
Frank Santos, the Austin lobbyist and consultant who commissioned the poll, conceded it's only a first attempt to grasp Hispanics' complex leanings.
The Board of Hispanic Caucus Chairs, a group of Hispanic legislative leaders from 32 states, paid for the poll. It was supervised by Cristina Garcia, a California-based researcher who studies Hispanic civic engagement. There were telephone interviews with 502 registered Hispanic voters, conducted Jan. 27-31, in either English or Spanish, at the choice of the voter surveyed. The poll has an error margin of 4.4 percent, meaning results can vary by that much in either direction.
A wakeup call
"It's really a wakeup call for both parties," said Santos, the group's executive director. "Either [Hispanics] are being taken for granted by the Democratic Party or they're being ignored by the Republican Party."
He said that of about 3 million new people added to Texas' population between 2000 and 2008, 63 percent were Hispanic.
A majority said they're conservative, but a bigger share, 63 percent, said they identify most with the Democratic Party. And 70 percent approve of the job that President Barack Obama is doing. Meanwhile, 54 percent approve of Perry's performance as governor; and 58 percent, of Hutchison's as senator.
"What does that say?" Santos said. "It says they're a growing, developing and evolving electorate."
Where the major candidates for governor stand on placing Texas Guard troops on the border with Mexico:
Background: President Barack Obama opposes sending U.S. troops to the border to combat violence from that nation's drug war, a decision that Gov. Rick Perry has criticized. Perry sent teams of Texas Rangers to help with security.
DEMOCRATS
Farouk Shami: Opposes it. Would work with the federal government to grant legal status to workers who turn over drug trafficking gang members.
Bill White: Doesn't say yes or no, but would "push the federal government to do its job."
REPUBLICANS
Kay Bailey Hutchison: Would allow retired law enforcement and military personnel to help local governments on the border.
Debra Medina: Would call "sufficient numbers" of Texas National Guard and Texas State Guard members to active duty to support local law enforcement .
Rick Perry: Says he has repeatedly urged the federal government to approve 1,000 National Guardsmen to support law enforcement operations.
http://www.dentonrc.com/sharedconten...s.39fae92.html
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Old 02-24-2010, 10:07 PM
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I heard the opinion that while "Latinos" voted for Obama, they also voted against gay marriage in California.

The idea is that "what's in it for me" versus general background beliefs is being overlooked by political bean counters. They are expecting political loyalty by race - not necessarily a fact.

Once again, race is not an indicator of nationality, language, culture, religion, or political belief. The Media and the politicians seem to believe it so, and are dumbfounded when their racial expectations are not met.
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Last edited by ilbegone; 02-24-2010 at 10:11 PM.
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Old 02-25-2010, 09:38 AM
Twoller Twoller is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeanfromfillmore View Post
....

But Camarillo said many Hispanics who identify themselves as conservative aren't talking about "less taxes, less government," the way white conservatives would.

"When a Latino says that he or she is conservative, they're thinking about how they are raising the kids and ... the family," she said. "It's more about work ethic, and that when you give your word, you give your word. Those kinds of things are what they're thinking of. It's a different frame of mind, and pollsters have yet to define it."

....
Sure, they consider themselves social conservatives in a sort of neanderthal reactionary way. All we have to do is look at Mexico itself and how people live there as an example of what they are talking about, we don't have to wait for some pollster to define it. The age of consent, for example.
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Old 02-25-2010, 05:58 PM
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ilbegone ilbegone is offline
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Originally Posted by Twoller View Post
Sure, they consider themselves social conservatives in a sort of neanderthal reactionary way. All we have to do is look at Mexico itself and how people live there as an example of what they are talking about, we don't have to wait for some pollster to define it. The age of consent, for example.
Multiple Choice.

What does "Hispanic" or "Latino" really mean?

A: An illegal alien Catholic from Mexico

B: Anyone who is brown with a Spanish surname, identical to Mexican Nationals in thought and deed. Without exception nefarious drunkards, drug dealers, welfare fraud artists, taggers, child molesters, gang bangers, and notable murderers.

C: Anyone or everyone who was born in a Latin American Nation or the Iberian Peninsula and considers himself a Spaniard, Cuban, Bolivian, Honduran, etc.

D: A and B:

E: The words are so broad as to be meaningless, with no real description of race, nationality, language, culture, religion, morality, education, or political belief.




More Questions:

Just who exactly are these people they are referring to as "Hispanic"?

Do polls ever ask rigged questions geared to get specific responses?

What do people who don't respond to polls really think?
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Last edited by ilbegone; 02-25-2010 at 06:13 PM.
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