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  #11  
Old 03-24-2010, 09:37 PM
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ilbegone ilbegone is offline
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Vago Rival Hells Angels:

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The Hells Angels Motorcycle Club (Hells Angels) is a worldwide "one-percenter" motorcycle gang with between 2,000 and 2,500 members who belong to over 230 chapters in the U.S. and in 26 foreign countries. The Hells Angels pose a criminal threat on six continents. U.S. law enforcement authorities estimate that the Hells Angels have more than 92 chapters in 27 states with a membership in excess of 800 persons. The Hells Angels are involved in the production, transportation and distribution of marijuana and methamphetamine. Additionally, the Hells Angels are involved in the transportation and distribution of cocaine, hashish, heroin, LSD, ecstasy, PCP and diverted pharmaceuticals. The Hells Angels are also involved in other criminal activity including assault, extortion, homicide, money laundering and motorcycle theft. Both the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Criminal Intelligence Service Canada classify the Angels as one of the "big four" outlaw motorcycle clubs. Members of the organization itself assert that this is a mischaracterization, and state that they are a group of motorcycle enthusiasts who organize social events such as group road trips, fundraisers, parties, and motorcycle rallies.


Insignia

The Hells Angels official web site attributes the official "death's head" insignia design to Frank Sadilek, past president of the San Francisco Chapter. The colors and shape of the early-style jacket emblem (prior to 1953) were copied from the insignias of the 85th Fighter Squadron and the 552nd Medium Bomber Squadron.

The Hells Angels utilize a system of patches, similar to military medals. Although the specific meaning of each patch is not publicly known, the patches identify specific or significant actions or beliefs of each biker. The official colors of the Hells Angels are red lettering displayed on a white background -- hence the club's nickname "The Red and White". These patches are worn on leather or denim jackets and vests.

Red and white are also used to display the number 81 on many patches, as in "Support 81, Route 81". The 8 and 1 stand for the respective positions in the alphabet of H and A. These are used by friends and supporters of the club, as only full members can wear any Hells Angels imagery.

The rhombus-shaped 'one-percenter' patch is also used, displaying '1%', in red on a white background with a red merrowed border. The term "one-percenter" is a response to the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) comment on the Hollister incident, in which the AMA stated that 99% of motorcyclists were law-abiding citizens and the last 1% were outlaws.

Most members wear a rectangular patch (again, white background with red letters and a red marrowed border) identifying their respective chapter locations. Another similarly designed patch reads "Hells Angels".

When applicable, members of the club wear a patch denoting their position or rank within the organization. The patch is rectangular, and, similarly to the patches described above, displays a white background with red letters and a red merrowed border. Some examples of the titles used are President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Sergeant at Arms. This patch is usually worn above the 'club location' patch.

Some members also wear a patch with the initials "AFFA", which stands for "Angels Forever; Forever Angels", referring to their lifelong membership in the biker club (i.e., "once a member, always a member").

The book Gangs, written by Tony Thompson (a crime correspondent for The Observer newspaper), states that Stephen Cunningham, a member of the Angels, sported a new patch after he recovered from attempting to set a bomb: two Nazi-style SS lightning bolts below the words 'Filthy Few'. Some law enforcement officials claim that the patch is only awarded to those who have committed, or are prepared to commit, murder on behalf of the club. According to a report from the R. v. Bonner and Lindsay case in 2005 (see related section below), another patch, similar to the 'Filthy Few' patch, is the 'Dequiallo' patch. This patch "signifies that the wearer has fought law enforcement on arrest". There is no common convention as to where the patches are located on the members' jacket/vest.

Hells Angels MC

Established: March 17, 1948 in Fontana, California, United States

Founder: Otto Friedli

Years active: 1948-present

Territory: Chapters in North America, South America, Europe, Russia, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia

Ethnicity: Predominantly White

Membership: 3,600 full-patch members worldwide

Criminal activities: Drug dealing, arms dealing, extortion, prostitution, trafficking in stolen goods

Allies: Aryan Brotherhood, Cali Cartel, Indian Posse, Warlocks and various other biker gangs

Rivals: Bandidos, Mongols, Outlaws and Pagans

Hells Angels MC is labeled a Street Gang
Wednesday, Sep. 23 2009

According to a jury and Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas, the Hells Angels Motorcycle Club are officially a "street gang."

The gang's new label comes as the result of the conviction of one of its members in a Maricopa County Superior Court last week, where jurors were specifically asked if they deemed the Hells Angels a "street gang." Well, they did and convicted 32-year-old Nathaniel Sample of aggravated assault and of acting for the benefit of a criminal street gang.

The conviction stems from a 2008 incident at the Billet Bar in Scottsdale, when Sample and another man allegedly used a beer bottle to beat a man in the head. The beating started after the victim accidentally bumped into Sample and only ended when a woman jumped on the victim to prevent the men from beating him further.

Labeling the group a street gang provides law enforcement with precedent that allows it to more aggressively pursue and prosecute members of the Hells Angels. "This verdict sends a message to all street gangs that their acts of violence and terror will not be tolerated," Andrew Thomas says in a statement.

http://whiteprisongangs.blogspot.com...ycle-club.html
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  #12  
Old 03-24-2010, 09:43 PM
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ilbegone ilbegone is offline
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Vago rival Nortenos:

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The Norteņos (Spanish: Northerners), also Norte, are affiliated with Nuestra Familia (Our Family), are a coalition of traditionally Latino gangs in Northern California. A member of these gangs is a Norteņo (male) or Norteņa (female); based on Spanish usage. Northern Californians who are not gang members, but feel a strong cultural affiliation with others in Northern California, may also refer to themselves as Norteņos/Norteņas or simply "Northerners."

The traditional rivals of the Norteņos are the Sureņos ("Southerners"). The statewide dividing line between Norteņos and Sureņos has roughly been accepted as the rural community of Delano, California. Norteņos may refer to Northern California as Norte, Spanish for "north".

In the late 1960s, Mexican-American (Chicano) inmates of the California state prison system began to separate into two rival groups, Norteņos (northerners) and Sureņos (southerners), according to the locations of their hometowns (the north-south dividing line is near Delano, California).

Norteņos affiliated with Nuestra Familia were prison enemies of the Southern Latinos who comprised La Eme, better known as the Mexican Mafia. While the Mexican Mafia had initially been created to protect Mexicans in prison, there was a perceived level of abuse by members of La Eme towards the imprisoned Latinos from rural farming areas of Northern California. The spark that led to the ongoing war between Norteņos and members of the Mexican Mafia involved a situation in which a member of La Eme allegedly stole a pair of shoes from a Northerner. This event put into motion the longest-running gang war in the state of California.

Federal law enforcement agencies, long unable to infiltrate the group, began to step up their investigations in the late 1990s. In 2000 and 2001, 22 members were indicted on racketeering charges, including several who were allegedly serving as high-ranking gang leaders while confined in Pelican Bay. Thirteen of the defendants pleaded guilty; the other cases are still ongoing. Two of the defendants face the death penalty for ordering murders related to the drug trade. The largest of the federal investigations was Operation Black Widow.

In the aftermath of Operation Black Widow, the five highest ranking leaders of the Norteņos were transferred to a federal supermax prison in Florence, Colorado. The written constitution of the Norteņos stated that the leadership of the gang reside in Pelican Bay State Prison in California; the relocation of the gang's leaders led to the confusion of its soldiers and a power struggle of prospective generals.

Three new generals came to power at Pelican Bay, yet two were demoted, leaving only David "DC" Cervantes as the highest ranking member of the gang in California. Cervantes' rise marked the first time in decades that the Norteņos had a single leader at the helm of their criminal organization. The remaining leadership of the organization in Pelican Bay consists of Daniel "Stork" Perez, Anthony "Chuco" Guillen and George "Puppet" Franco. While all Norteņo soldiers and captains in California are expected to follow the orders of Cervantes, a small percentage of the gang remains loyal to the former generals and captains imprisoned in Colorado. California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has complained that keeping the five remaining gang leaders located in the same prison continues to add to California gang violence, and that they should be scattered throughout different prisons. While the recognized leaders of the Norteņos in Pelican Bay ask that members respect the former leaders, they have been effectively stripped of their authority. The former leaders include James "Tibbs" Morado, Joseph "Pinky" Hernandez, Gerald "Cuete" Rubalcaba, Cornelio Tristan, and Tex Marin Hernandez.

Norteņo emblems and clothing are based on the color red. A typical Norteņo outfit might include a red belt, red shoes, and red shoelaces. They will also favor sports team apparel that shows their affiliation through symbolism such as the Nebraska Cornhuskers football, UNLV, K-Swiss, and San Francisco 49ers.

Norteņos may refer to each other by using the term "Ene", Spanish for the letter "N". Norteņos use the number 14 in tattoos and graffiti because "N" is the fourteenth letter of the alphabet. It is sometimes written as "X4", or in Roman numerals as "XIV". Some Norteņos will tattoo themselves with four dots. Norteņo derogatorily refers to a Sureņo as a "Scrap" or "Sur (Sewer) Rat", while a Sureņo will likewise refer to a Norteņo as a "Buster" or "Chap" (Chapete).

Norteņos also lay claim to images of the Mexican-American labor movement, such as the sombrero, machete, and "Huelga bird", symbols of the United Farm Workers.

Territory: Northern California & Central California

Ethnicity: predominantly Hispanic

Criminal activities: Drug trafficking, assault, auto theft, burglary, homicide, robbery

Allies: Nuestra Familia, Northern Structure, Black Guerilla Family

Rivals: Sureņos, Mexican Mafia, Mexikanemi, Aryan Brotherhood, Florencia 13, 18th Street Gang

Watsonville man suspected in 2005 prison-ordered gang hit
By Jennifer Squires
Posted: 09/04/2009

WATSONVILLE -- An alleged prison-gang hit man suspected in the attempted murder of a fellow Norteno gang member four years ago has been arrested by Watsonville police.

Freddie "Danger" Guzman drove the car Sept. 17, 2005 while his accomplice Anthony "Tigre" Rubalcava shot Mark Escobedo in the chest and left him for dead on the side of Highway 152, according to authorities.

But Escobedo, who investigators say was not in good standing with the gang and was marked for murder by Nuestra Familia prison gang leaders, didn't die.

Instead, he helped investigators identify his would-be killers.

Earlier this summer, Rubalcava was arrested, charged and found guilty of gang-motivated attempted murder in Santa Clara County. The 33-year-old was sent to state prison for 55 years to life.

Tuesday, a warrant was issued for Guzman, who was arrested during a traffic stop Wednesday on Arlene Drive, Watsonville police reported. He faces the same sentence, if convicted.

Police said the attempt on Escobedo's life can be traced to Nuestra Familia leaders in prison. Both Rubalcava and Guzman, now 31, served prison sentences before the attack on Escobedo.

Watsonville police Sgt. Saul Gonzalez said the two suspected hit men connected in prison and rose within the Norteno organization. They had marching orders when they were released from prison, Gonzalez said.

One of their instructions, allegedly, was to murder Escobedo.

"It's very hard to trace it back to who actually ordered it," Gonzalez said. "We have a lot of incidents where gang members are assaulted by their own gang for discipline, but some of them can be as minor as being jumped or hit across the face. ... This one seemed like they were trying to kill him."

The three men were not in the same gang subset, but all were players within the Norteno scene in Watsonville and knew each other, according to Gonzalez.

The night Rubalcava and Guzman are thought to have targeted Escobedo, they allegedly told him to drive over Mount Madonna with them to Gilroy to collect money from drug sales. Gonzalez said revenue from narcotics trafficking is taxed by Nortenos and funneled to Nuestra Familia officials in prison.

The trio didn't make it to Gilroy.

Just across the Santa Cruz-Santa Clara county line, Guzman, the driver, pulled off the road, police said. Rubalcava then shot Escobedo in the chest -- he was later convicted of that crime by a jury -- and the two alleged hit men fled.

A passing motorist noticed Escobedo bleeding on the side of the road and called 911, according to investigators, who credit the fast-responding ambulance to Escobedo's survival.

"When they left I think they assumed he was dead," Gonzalez said.

After the shooting, Escobedo, now 29, distanced himself from his gang, police said. Eventually, detectives from Watsonville police and the Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office and District Attorney's Office put the pieces together.

Escobedo testified against Rubalcava this summer and said Guzman drove the car, police said.

It's still unclear why led gang leaders might have ordered the hit.

"Sometimes it can just be on a belief, a rumor," Gonzalez said, explaining that many of the city's unsolved beatings, stabbings and shootings are likely tied to gang-ordered punishment. "A lot of the stuff, when victims don't cooperate, it is internal conflict."
__________________
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Hay burros en el maiz

RAP IS TO MUSIC WHAT ETCH-A-SKETCH IS TO ART

Don't drink and post.

"A nickel will get you on the subway, but garlic will get you a seat." - Old New York Yiddish Saying

"You can observe a lot just by watching." Yogi Berra

Old journeyman commenting on young apprentices - "Think about it, these are their old days"

SOMETIMES IT JUST DOESN'T MAKE SENSE.

Never, ever, wear a bright colored shirt to a stand up comedy show.

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  #13  
Old 03-24-2010, 09:55 PM
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ilbegone ilbegone is offline
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My conclusion is that the issues here are much more complex than seeing the word "Vago" and equating it with "Illegal alien".
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Freibier gab's gestern

Hay burros en el maiz

RAP IS TO MUSIC WHAT ETCH-A-SKETCH IS TO ART

Don't drink and post.

"A nickel will get you on the subway, but garlic will get you a seat." - Old New York Yiddish Saying

"You can observe a lot just by watching." Yogi Berra

Old journeyman commenting on young apprentices - "Think about it, these are their old days"

SOMETIMES IT JUST DOESN'T MAKE SENSE.

Never, ever, wear a bright colored shirt to a stand up comedy show.

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  #14  
Old 03-26-2010, 04:03 PM
Kathy63 Kathy63 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilbegone View Post
My conclusion is that the issues here are much more complex than seeing the word "Vago" and equating it with "Illegal alien".
You are right. Unfortuately the accurate connection would be a word we dare not speak, and the accurate connection would mark the speaker as a racist.

The dreaded H word.
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  #15  
Old 03-26-2010, 09:52 PM
Rim05 Rim05 is offline
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It has crossed my mind that this is not the gang but a drug cartel. Could be drugs and they have infiltrated the PD and that is why they know details about what the PD is doing.
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