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Immigration Pushed To The Forefront Again.... Thanks! To Everyone Who Has Propelled This Issue To Its' Rightful Position. Years Of Hard Work Are Paying Off.....Keep Up The Good Work!......
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  #71  
Old 10-23-2009, 07:11 PM
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Old 10-10-2009, 10:22 PM
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I want to take this on a slightly different heading, but I might take a couple or few days off from this thread before I do.
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  #72  
Old 10-23-2009, 07:11 PM
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I want to take this on a slightly different heading, but I might take a couple or few days off from this thread before I do.
Smoke 'em if you got 'em.

I've been scoping out some possible billboard sites in this regard. We have a new Schools Super up here ya know.....he's says he going to listen for the first 100 days
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Old 10-23-2009, 07:12 PM
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Old 10-12-2009, 09:43 PM
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Just for a little diversion, some LA County Cholo humor.

Quote:
Man Shoots Self While Posing for Picture

Boyle Heights

Hector Robles won’t be smiling for any cameras anytime soon. From his hospital bed, he warns people to be careful while posing with guns. “I know it looks cool but just make sure you know how to use the safety and don’t point them at yourself.”

Just two days ago Hector, a resident of Boyle Heights California, was rushed to the USC Medical Center after accidentally shooting himself twice while posing with two small hand guns. “I was trying to take a picture to post as my profile for MySpace.com when both guns in my hands somehow went off.” stated Robles.

Hector Robles already has 46 comments on his pictures on MySpace.com.

Most of the comments are from teenage cholas who have left comments like “Damn ese you look sexy eh.”

Does Hector regret taking the picture? “No. Shooting myself, yes.” said Robles. Police told reporters that as soon as Hector is released from the hospital, he will be taken into police custody for having unlicensed firearms.

“It’s all good holmes.” Said Hector, “This is only strike two.”
I see this as like Jeff Foxworthy and his Redneck humor - the laugh comes from (however exaggerated or unexpected) how the grain of truth is presented.

From Puro Pedo Magazine, which I believe can be loosely translated as "a bunch of bull shit", "just fooling around", or "just kidding".
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Old 10-23-2009, 07:12 PM
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Old 10-12-2009, 09:55 PM
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Graduation

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SANTA BARBARA, CA- UC Santa Barbara graduate Juan Moreno delivered a graduation speech few will forget: a speech riddled with quotes from the Chicano cult movie classic “Bound By Honor: BloodIn, Blood Out.”

Moreno started out in typical fashion, addressing the crowd and thanking the chair of the Chicano Studies Department who introduced him. Then Moreno did the unexpected: he recited verbatim the scholarship acceptance speech of movie character Cruz Candaleria (played by Jesse Borrego).

“My mom was very upset and angry,” said Jaime, Moreno’s brother. “She wasn’t acknowledged at all in the speech. She hit my dad upside the head when Luis thanked his step-mother Dolores. We don’t have a step-mom. My parents aren’t even divorced.”

But Moreno’s homage didn’t end with his recitation of Cruz’s speech. He went on to parrot other quotes that had no clear connection to the graduation or education.

“Most of the time I don’t even pay attention to speakers at graduations,” stated Virginia Lopez, a fellow graduate. “But when I heard him talking about porkchops and calling everyone ‘babycakes’ my ears perked up. I haven’t seen that much stage plagerism since Carlos Mencia performed on campus.”

“As soon as the ceremony was over, I called my secretary and told her to rent me a copy of the movie,” Vice Chancellor Lawrence Sellers stated. “I have no idea what a ‘Chicano u-turn’ is, but I intend to find out.”

The Vice Chancellor said that the graduation speech was so dense with movie references that many attendees had trouble discerning what message Moreno was trying to convey. “Initially when Moreno said ‘Hey, Cinderella! Go find yourself a fella. You’re on the clock bitch and midnight is coming,’ I didn’t know what to think,” he stated.

“But then again, maybe he was reminding the graduates that life is short. That we are all on the clock, so to speak, and that like Cinderella, we should follow our hearts and seek out our dreams,” Sellers mused.

What did the other graduates think? “This ain’t no pinche card game, ese,” Benjamin Flores said. But after some thought, he just shrugged his shoulders and said, “Life’s a risk, carnal.”

By: Angela “Chola” Portillo
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  #75  
Old 10-23-2009, 07:13 PM
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Old 10-12-2009, 10:20 PM
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Graduation
Like I wrote before, they really don't have much to say when it comes to anything that's outside the Chicano victim realm. Will they ever realize it? Probably not.
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Old 10-23-2009, 07:14 PM
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Old 10-12-2009, 10:23 PM
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Chicano Militant Workshop


Quote:
El P.P.'s 12-Step Plan on How to Run a Chingon Chicano Militant Workshop

Step 1: Agenda Like any undertaking, you must prepare for your workshop by making an agenda. We recommend creating an outline to use your 50 minutes of workshop time wisely, from our experience prepare an agenda that will cover the following topics:

1. Pre-Contact Mesoamerica

2. Colonization

3. La Indendencia de 1821

4. The US-Mexico War

5. Zoot Suit Riots

6. The Chicano Movement of the 1970's

7. The Zapatistas

8. [INSERT HERE WHAT YOU PLAN ON TALKING ABOUT IN THE
WORKSHOP]

9. How much cooler Chicana authors are than Chicano authors
and last but not least...

10. What is a Chicana/o? or What is a Xican@?

Step 2: Appearance is Everything.

Make sure that you are dressed in the most militant of Chican@ gear! We recommend your wear a t-shirt with the latest designs by Votan, which can be found at the Nahui Ohlin store in Echo Park, or any black long sleeve shirt by Anahuak Designs.com. Ojo! Mujeres, if you wear a hupil, you must wear your hair in trenzas!

Step 3: Prep Time

Upon arrival at the classroom, pre-arrange all the chairs in a circle so that everyone's voice is equal during the chingon workshop (Only the colonizer puts chairs is rows).

Step 4: Roll Deep

Once your workshop agenda is set, try to enlist the help of an Ol'Skool Mechista to present with you at the conferencia. This way if your workshop goes down in flames, you and the veterano can resort to shouting at the top of your lungs at people: "What are you doing for la causa!?!"

Step 5: Beginning & Ending the Workshop

Begin the workshop by blowing a conch shell to the four directions. At the end of the workshop, make sure you walk around and give each and every person in your workshop a Chicano Power handshake.

Step 6: Lay Down the Law

Punking a wise-ass Mechista from MEChA de Berkeley or Berkeley MEChA at the beginning of the workshop will get you automatic street cred! Let the crowd know that your $26 a unit at Community College was a much smarter option than Berkeley's $9,999.99 a semester from the get go!

Step 7: Classroom Management

In order to reduce the chaos that will surely follow due to the revolutionary and decolonizing nature of El P.P.'s 12-Step Program on How to Run a Chingon Chicano Militant Workshop (hey, decolonization is a hell of a drug!) we recommend that you use a speaking stick instead of calling on people who raise their hands (only teacher pet's from the suburb raise their hands in class).

Step 8: Seize the Moment

Use this opportunity to bad mouth all the MEChA chapters and Mechistas you don't agree with politically or for whatever reason... hey you took the time to put together a workshop, use those 50 minutes wisely!

Step 9: Keep Your Friends Close...

Befriend all the Community College Mechistas at the workshop before they transfer and become tainted by the UC, you may need them next time an amendment is made to the Progressive Political Agenda.

Step 10: Never Lose an Argument

It is important to save face, this is the Golden Rule in running a Chingon Chicano Militant Workshop. If anyone starts talking shit in your workshop repeat this line, "My ideas came from the ancestors", this should win the argument. If this doesn't work, accuse them of being part of Liga, you'll have them on the run then

Step 11: Incorporate Multimedia

Be a High-Tek Aztek! Always use an excerpt from the PBS Chicano! Documentary, there are four videos to choose from. If you can't get of hold of them, 'Viva La Causa! by Betita Martinez will work nicely.

Step 12: Contact Information

Before the end of the workshop, leave your contact information on the board. Make sure to set up a new email account with a Nahuatl name ahead of time... cuz angelbaby626@yahoo.com is not as cool as Muxer_Revolucionaria@azteca.ne
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  #77  
Old 10-23-2009, 07:14 PM
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Old 10-12-2009, 10:27 PM
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Like I wrote before, they really don't have much to say when it comes to anything that's outside the Chicano victim realm. Will they ever realize it? Probably not.
In these quotes, they're actually poking fun at the knuckleheads who are doing it in real life.

Once again, think of Foxworthy and Red Neck humor.

Note that in the post you referred to Moreno (giving the speech) is in a Chicano style of outer space, and the white Vice Chancellor is clueless about what is going on but supportive of it. The Vice Chancellor will be clueless forever, he's living in the "teacher land" parallel universe. Moreno's mother gets the absurd idea that her husband is having an affair. In the mean time, the audience is watching a freak show at the podium during graduation. Carlos Mencia (from Central America) gets slammed as a plagerist. Flores, quoted at the end, is as whacked out as Moreno.

They're making fun of the process.

Same thing with the "Chicano Militant Work Shop".
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Old 10-23-2009, 07:15 PM
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Old 10-13-2009, 01:32 PM
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While the beginning of the Chicano movement in the early 60’s had many streams which became a river, the rhetoric and wording of Chicanismo can be traced to several individuals who could be described as founding fathers.

One of them, Reies Tijerina, was designated “First national hero of Aztlan” in 1969 at the conference hosted by Corky Gonzales’ bunch in Denver, and is required reading in Chicano Studies.

From a diary entry in 1974 in Tijerina‘s autobiography:

Quote:
The Anglo created the Black Legend against Spain. For more than three hundred years that false propaganda was used until the western world turned against Spain.

Using false propaganda, the Anglo has gotten into two world wars to defend the root of it’s race: England.

Later, for the past twenty-nine years they have used false propaganda in opposition to Communism.

They have used the same type of false propaganda against the land recovery movement and me.
The origin of the Black Legend was the Spanish Priest Las Casas, who witnessed and decried the swift near extermination of Caribbean Indians by Spaniards in a very few years after discovery.

The English merely ran with the tale. The French may have latched on to it too, because If I remember right, de Toqueville wrote in DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA that if it hadn’t been for the fact that Indians grew all the food in New Spain, the Spaniards would have exterminated them.

England, France, and Spain have almost always been enemies of one sort or another, broken only by matters of temporary convenience.

The rest of Tijerina’s statement speaks for itself.

Tijerina’s autobiography is a tough read for me, nearly every page says nearly the same thing, like an endless loop of about 200 hundred words merely re-arranged to repeat the first page’s message over and over and over again.

I have to read it in small doses.
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Old 10-23-2009, 07:15 PM
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Old 10-13-2009, 01:37 PM
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To early activist Tijerina, the white man was up his ass and dancing on his hemorhoids, the “Anglo race” was psychopathic. Almost every one of them with a sinister, conspiratorial anti -“Indohispano” agenda. Tijerina wrote Johnson and Nixon on a regular basis concerning the land grant cause and his several incarcerations, but believed that both were out to get him using the vast resources of the US Government.

It seems that quite a few people, including Jose Angel Gutierrez' father and other people Tijerina would describe as "Indohispano" , regarded Tijerina as a dangerous lunatic. When asked why he was against the land recovery movement, Senator Montoya of New Mexico said that he wasn't against land recovery (for land grant heirs), but that he was against Tijerina, then described Tijerina as a racist who would pit Anglos against his people and added that Tijerina "is not from here... he is not one of us" (Tijerina was from Texas). No doubt that Montoya is regarded by Chicanista thought as a "vendido coconut"


On the other hand, writer Richard Rodriguez also disliked Richard Nixon (but was fascinated by Nixon's character as he was Benjamin Franklin's), but had a much different view of Nixon and Johnson:


Quote:
…The Negro Civil rights movement became, during Johnson’s administration, the great American novel. America had to admit that the game had been rigged for millions of its own citizens… If America were to persist as a novel, then the opening chapter had to be repaired, at least to the extent that a black child could imagine Harvard in the distance. The revised chapter would henceforth be titled “Affirmative Action”…

Throughout the Johnson administration, domestic considerations of race remained black and white. Baptist hymns were converted to statistics. And since race, not social class, was the nation’s most important metaphor for social division, Americans of every description were advancing their claims to government redress by analogy to Negro disadvantage.

Statistics were transported into hues and distributed along a black and white spectrum. In college, because of Lyndon Johnson, I became a “minority student”. But it was not until Richard Nixon’s administration that I became brown. A government document of dulling prose, Statisical Directive 15, would redefine America as an idea in five colors: White. Black. Yellow. Red. Brown.

To a generation of Americans - the first generation of affirmative action, these catagories became alternatives for any more subjective self-description…

In Six Crises, Nixon recalls that his mother, Hannah, prayed he might become a Quaker missionary to Central America. In a secular transposition of that vocation, Nixon ended up my Godfather. Because of Nixon, several million Americans were baptized Hispanic.

After all Richard Nixon had written about how hard work wins the day in America, finally it was Nixon who arranged for me to bypass all the old rules. Through he agency of affirmative action… I had, suddenly, a powerful father in America, like Old Man Kennedy. I had, in short, found a way to cheat.

The saddest part of the story is that Nixon was willing to disown his own myth for political expediency. It would be the working class kid - the sort he had been - who would end up paying the price of affirmative action, not Kennedys. Affirmative action defined a “minority” in numerical rather than a cultural sense. And since white males were already numerically “represented” in the board room, as at Harvard, the Appalachian white kid could not qualify as a minority. And since brown and black faces were “under represented”, those least disadvantaged brown and black Americans, like me, were able to claim the prize of admission and no one questioned our progress…

Myself as a child of fortune? Lyndon Johnson might do for the Victorian benefactor; was mine, in any case. During Johnson’s administration I became eligible for affirming moneys. I did not initially question this diversion of my novel, and Richard Rodriguez, the child of fortune … who thought his American entitlement came as a descendant of Benjamin Franklin - our “forefathers,” he had been taught to say, and he believed it! -Richard progressed in a direction more British than American.

Benjamin Franklin would have never qualified for affirmative action… None of them would have qualified - Franklin, Johnson, Nixon.

My election saw me through the last years of graduate school - and beyond, to this very page.
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Old 10-23-2009, 07:16 PM
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Old 10-14-2009, 10:06 PM
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Here are some more Rodriguez quotes (five posts).

I don't like to quote so extensively, but it's the whole meat of the issue.

Rodriguez 1)

Quote:
...Consider my father: when he decided to apply for American citizenship, my father told no one, none of his friends, those men whom he had come to this country with looking for work. American citizenship would have seemed a betrayal of Mexico, a sin against memory. One afternoon, like a man with something to hide, my father slipped away. He went downtown to the Federal building in Sacramento, and disappeared into America.

Now memory takes her revenge on the son...

I once had the occasion to ask a middle class Mexican what he admires about the United States, (a provocative question because, according to Mexican history and proverb, there is nothing about the United States to admire). He found only one disembodied word: “organization”. When I pressed the man to anthropomorphize further, he said, “Deliveries get made, phones are answered, brakes are repaired” (indirect constructions all, as if by the construction of unseen hands)...

Mexico, mad mother. She still does not know what to make of our leaving. For most of this century Mexico has seen her children flee the house of memory. During the Revolution 10 percent of the population picked up and moved to the United States; in the decades following the Revolution, Mexico has watched many more of her children cast their lots with the future; head north for work, for wages, for life. Bad enough that so many left, worse that so many left for the gringo...

I would see them downtown on Sundays – men my age drunk in Plaza Park. I was still a boy at 16, but I was an American.

Or they would come into town Monday night for the wrestling matches or on tuesday nights for boxing. They worked on the ranches over in Yolo County. They were men with time on their hands, They were men without women. They were Mexicans without Mexico...

My parents left Mexico in the twenties: she as a girl with her family; he as a young man, alone. To tell different stories. Two Mexicos. At some celebration - we went to so many when I was a boy – a man in the crowd filled his lungs with American air to crow over all, !VIVA MEXICO! Everyone cheered. My parents cheered. The band played louder. Why VIVA MEXICO? The country that had betrayed them? The country that forced them to live elsewhere?

I remember standing in the doorway of my parents' empty bedroom.

Mexico was a memory – not mine. Mexico was mysteriously both he and she, like this, like my parents' bed. And over my parents' bed floated the Virgin of Guadalupe in a dime store frame. In its most potent guise, Mexico was a mother like this queen...

A true mother, Mexico would not distinguish among her children. Her protective arm extended not only to the Mexican nationals working in the United States, but to the larger number of Mexican – Americans as well. Mexico was not interested in passports; Mexico was interested in blood. No matter how far away you moved, you were still related to her...

In 1959, Octavio Paz, Mexico's sultan son, her clever one -philosopher, poet, statesman - published the Labyrinth of Solitude, his reflections on Mexico. Within his labyrinth, Paz places as well the Mexican American. He writes of the Pachuco, the teenage gang member, and, by implication, the Mexican American. “The Pachuco does not want to become Mexican again; at the same time he does not want to blend into the life of North America. His whole being is sheer negative impulse, a tangle of contradictions, an enigma”.

This was Mother Mexico talking, her good son; this was Mexico's metropolitan version of Mexican Americans. Mexico had lost language, lost gods, lost ground. Mexico recognized historical confusion in us.

When we return to Mexico as turistas, with our little wads of greenbacks, our credit cards, our Japanese cameras, our Bermuda shorts, our pauses for directions and our pointing fingers, Mexico condescends to take our order (our order in halting Spanish), claro senor. But the table is not clear; the table will never be cleared. Mexico prefers to reply in English, as a way of saying:

!Pocho!

The Mexican American who forgets his true mother is a pocho, a person of no address, a child of no proper idiom.

But blood is blood, or perhaps, in this case, language is blood...

And most Mexican Americans lived in barrios, apart from gringos; many still retained Spanish as if in homage to her (Mexico). We were still her children.

As long as we didn't marry...
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