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Immigration Pushed To The Forefront Again.... Thanks! To Everyone Who Has Propelled This Issue To Its' Rightful Position. Years Of Hard Work Are Paying Off.....Keep Up The Good Work!......
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Old 01-21-2013, 10:12 PM
Greg in LA Greg in LA is offline
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Default Has the USA always been this insane?

Question for those reading this that are older than 45.

"Has the USA always been this insane"

You are all aware of the problems here, the economy, immigration, public sector unions bankrupting the municipalities, Whites Americans rapidly becoming minorities, high divorce rates, high illegitimacy rates, and the government unwilling to enforce many laws.

Please, someone who is older than me, who has had a longer experience in this country, could you please tell me if my country has always been insane.
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Old 01-22-2013, 11:50 AM
Don Don is offline
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No. The country was not always insane. I'm old enough to have witnessed the transformation.

In the 50's and 60's when I grew up, the US was an ascending civilization. Today it is a civilization in decline.

In the 50's we were on the dawn of the space age. Sputnik hit this country like a thunderclap and there was a call to raise rather than to lower performance in schools. The space program was a great unifier that embodied the highest aspects of the signature achievement of Western Civilization: The Voyage of Discovery. In those days the history of voyages of discovery by Europeans who had mastered ship building and navigation skills were matters of pride rather than shame and it was kind of like there was a straight line from going around the world in a sailing ship to leaving the Earth and exploring other worlds in a rocked powered space ship.

The world joined the US in applauding our landing on the moon. The space program did not just secure the technical superiority of the US and unify Americans, it unified the world in something everyone could be proud of. If you want to be admired, do admirable things and in those days this country did just that. America was not universally admired, but its landing on the Moon was.

Real incomes increased during that era and there was a rising trajectory of expectations that continued until the early 1970's. In the 50's and early 60's, prices were pretty much stable, even with high employment and rising incomes. High inflation did not hit until the late 60's early 70's. It seems weird that for 10-15 years prices would stay stable and real incomes would increase, but that's the way it was.

Schools were completely different. My father's employment was military related and I went to school all over the country in a dozen different states. I liked some schools and some teachers better than others, but truthfully I never had a bad teacher or a bad school. My teachers were all professional, courteous, sympathetic people and they spent their time teaching the subject matter, not campaigning full time for the Democrat Party and preaching anti-White hatred. They were, in a word, "classy."

Students were also different then too. I never heard a student curse a teacher. Not one time. Today, teachers tell me they are relieved to be cursed out instead of being physically assaulted. Also, parents supported teachers. If the teacher called home and said you were clowning around in class and being a disruption, your parents kicked your ass and got your mind right. If you were doing poorly the teacher called home and your parents turned off the TV and made you do homework and helped you instead of demanding tax increases on the rich or suing the schools for "civil rights" violations. (Read Barack Obama's book Dreams From My Father, where he describes his white mother tutoring him for three hours per day but as a community organizer he tells black mothers to organize for more tax money and subsidies instead of helping their kids with homework as his mother helped him.)


Jobs were readily available. Workers were in demand and a college degree meant a good job. Even blue collar jobs were good. Families could afford to buy a new car every five years and own a home on a single salary.

The culture was different. In those days you could hear church bells on Sunday mornings. It doesn't sound like a very important thing, but even if you don't believe in religion, it was very uplifting and peaceful to hear that sound. There was something very calming and reassuring about it.

Outside of New York City, there was no gun control. You could buy mail order guns. We had no school shootings. We actually had guns in the schools in the guise of the Reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC) and we had rifle competition with other schools. On my way to spend summer on uncle's ranch in Texas, I walked through the airport and got on a commercial airliner with a cased .22 rifle and nobody batted an eye. After turning 18, I plunked down fifty bucks for a Colt .45 auto with no background checks or waiting period. You can't imagine the freedom we had.

People were different too. As a child at family gatherings or between my parents and their friends, grown ups talked about the Great Depression and how hard it was. But they were always cheerful and laughed at the hardships they endured. My dad and his older brother had one good pair of shoes between then and they'd go on dates on different nights so that they could share their one pair of shoes. They laughed about it without bitterness or hatred. People also talked about how much they helped and were helped by each other during those hard times. Complete strangers would share what little they had with others who were less fortunate. I heard these kinds of stories over and over from different people in different parts of the country. My dad was from the north and my mom from the South and they had different religions and different accents, yet both extended families told substantially the same stories about meeting the hardships of the depression and the years of WW2 and helping and being helped by strangers. I never saw a house with bars on the windows and doors like today, where entire neighborhoods and even the churches are fortified with bars and locked gates.

By contrast, today, people are terrified of each other and avoid personal contact as much as possible. A few months ago I walked up to another motorist in a crowded shopping center parking in broad daylight to ask for help with a jump to start my car. I was alone and wearing a suit and tie. He looked terrified and sped away without even rolling down his window.

Working my way through college in the 60's, it never took me more than a couple of days to get some kind of work: Full time in the summer or part time during the school year. In those days, people who needed yard work or odd jobs done would call local colleges for students to do work. I got a lot of jobs that way. When I graduated from college, I got a management trainee job with a major corporation and was promoted to a management position in 18 months.


In 1967 I helped organize a rally to support our men in Viet Nam. The one cop who was assigned to keep order, stood under a shade tree with folded arms looking at his watch as he waited to go home. A couple of anti-war people showed up, but they were polite and friendly and did not try to break up our gathering. Today you couldn't have a small rally of a few hundred people like that without a small army of cops to protect you from the Left or the Mexicans.

Money went a lot further. Candy bars and newspapers cost a dime. Postage stamps cost .03. Gas was .30 a gallon. My first new car out of college, a top of the line model, cost $4,500.00. My payments were $86 a month. You could rent a nice apartment for $150.00 per month.

To answer your question: No. America was not always insane. In my life time we had hope, optimism and accomplishments, such as the space program, for which America was universally admired, even as it was disliked for other reasons. In those days we did have problems such as the Cold War, but we also had hope and we saw and experienced progress with our own eyes and our own paychecks. The Cold War loomed over us in its various guises, whether in the arms race, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the wars in Viet Nam and other places, but it was obvious that the Communist government didn't have the support of their peoples and that sooner or later Communism would collapse under the weight of its own contradictions. This is what happened to the USSR in 1989. Cuba and North Korea are now isolated hold outs from which their citizens risk their lives to escape...just like at the height of the Cold War. Ultimately, the US won the Cold War by being a better country, not by force of arms in a world war. Thank God!

Today, there is little hope for any kind of decent future for the US. The American population is being dispossessed and ethnically cleansed by third world primitives who are transforming our country into what they came here to escape. I predict one of two things: (1) A civil war that will culminate in a brutal police state like the Bolshevik Revolution with suppression of freedom, slave labor camps and mass murder, or, (2) a collapse and break up of the US similar to the collapse of USSR with new regions being organized along ethnic lines. The black and Mexican areas will be ungovernable and uninhabitable, just like they are today, and there will be a flood of refugees to the white areas so that they can attach themselves to hated white racists for a "better life." This time they will not be welcomed with open arms and free healthcare.

Last edited by Don; 01-22-2013 at 12:59 PM.
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Old 01-22-2013, 01:06 PM
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Ayatollahgondola Ayatollahgondola is offline
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While Don is right about many things, I think there's a bit of propaganda overall. There were recessions, and jobs were scarce then. While there was a bit more demand and adherence to respect for authority, Blacks, mainly those in the south, were expected to have a lot more respect than whites. There was a little more respect for the American dollar, and the US taxpayers money, except where war was concerned (vietnam). Forced conscription (the draft) was staring our generation in the face. I still have my first draft card. Although jobs were available throught my younger years, I was exposed to sexual harrassment, verbal abuse, and the ever present threat of termination for participating in say...an antiwar demonstration.
There are differences now, that obviously compel my activism. While I don't subscribe to Don's theories on genetics, I will admit that there has been a concerted effort to downgrade white people, and white culture. I do speak out about that as many here would know. There is also zero respect for american sovereignty now, whereas back then it was taken for granted. We didn't seem to casually elect as many boobs and criminals as representatives overall back then, but once again, many black people in the south would disagree
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Old 01-22-2013, 01:16 PM
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Ayatollahgondola Ayatollahgondola is offline
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Originally Posted by Don View Post
In 1967 I helped organize a rally to support our men in Viet Nam. The one cop who was assigned to keep order, stood under a shade tree with folded arms looking at his watch as he waited to go home. A couple of anti-war people showed up, but they were polite and friendly and did not try to break up our gathering. Today you couldn't have a small rally of a few hundred people like that without a small army of cops to protect you from the Left or the Mexicans. .
You obviously weren't in the red zones of the anti-war movement, although '67 might have been a bit before the momentum. Any real opposition to the war was often met with force, and it wasn't always the anti-war people that touched of a skirmish...or riot as they were often referred to. Expressing your opinion back then sometimes got you hurt....by the cops...not any ethnic or pro-war groups. In that regard, we have it way better during our protest of illegal immigration. The tear gas ain't flyin' and you ain't getting billy clubbed or kicked by uniforms. Many of us were arrested for minor stuff for just being in the vicinity, but not necessarily attacking the cops.
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Old 01-22-2013, 04:03 PM
Don Don is offline
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Originally Posted by Ayatollahgondola View Post
You obviously weren't in the red zones of the anti-war movement, although '67 might have been a bit before the momentum. Any real opposition to the war was often met with force, and it wasn't always the anti-war people that touched of a skirmish...or riot as they were often referred to. Expressing your opinion back then sometimes got you hurt....by the cops...not any ethnic or pro-war groups. In that regard, we have it way better during our protest of illegal immigration. The tear gas ain't flyin' and you ain't getting billy clubbed or kicked by uniforms. Many of us were arrested for minor stuff for just being in the vicinity, but not necessarily attacking the cops.


I described my own personal experiences, not yours which are unknown to me and for which I'm not authorized to speak in any event. If you had different experiences that are eating away at your insides, go for it. You don't need permission from me. I note that you opted to stay in the US rather than to migrate to Cuba, Mexico or some other place for a "better life."

I also don't speak for anti-war protestors and certainly not for blacks in the South or any place else for that matter. Blacks with grievances don't need my help to proclaim their hatred of white people or to press their insatiable demands for "reparations" and other benefits incident to the legally favored level of citizenship to which they have been elevated.

I didn't mean to suggest that the US was an idyllic utopia in the 50's and 60's. It was not always a bed of roses for me, either.

I wrote an op-ed for my college newspaper the Black Student Union didn't like. They came to the newspaper office to attack me, trashed the place and beat up a white liberal whose bad luck was to be there instead of me. I guess we all look alike to them.

The liberal they beat up hated me. Is it not poetic justice that he got his ass kicked for something I wrote?

In the aftermath, I was called to the office of the College President to discuss this event. He asked me to "moderate" my writing style. I asked if any of the perpetrators would be prosecuted? He said, " Probably not. We must not over react!"

There you have it: Free speech liberal style, straight from the horse's...ah....mouth. This message, loud and clear, has resonated for the last half century throughout out America. If you're targeted for racially motivated violence by racial minorities, it's not their fault. IT'S YOURS!
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Old 01-22-2013, 06:16 PM
Greg in LA Greg in LA is offline
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Don, says that America has definitely become more insane.

I'm not sure if Ayatollah is saying there is more or less insanity in our country now vs. 40 years ago. I'm getting the sense that Ayatollah is implying that the country was already fairly insane.

Whats striking me the most of both of your statements is your description of how plentiful the jobs were.

I concur on the job situation. A steady job these days is fairly golden and I am old enough to remember needing only a couple of weeks to get a job, even as a young person with little skills.

We're getting a lot of college graduated "interns" who are willing to work for free, and they don't need college credits because they've already graduated. I graduated in 1989 and believe me in those days the thought of doing an "internship" during college or after college unpaid would have seemed so ridicules it never would have crossed our minds.

Some people say we are more prosperous now than 40-60 years ago, in terms of cars and home ownership and stuff in our houses, but look at the divorce levels, and bankruptcy rates. Our countries population has also sky-rocketed, (mostly due to immigration).

I would still like to get a few more voices about the insanity level of our society and our government, whether it has increased and if so how much.

I think I should clarify my term insanity. The insanity I'm describing is all of the destructive policies and attitudes of our government and our people, the kind of actions that have little concern for the repercussions of actions and future impact on others and our society's future stability.

I see so little concern by our elites in government and business in fostering a stable society and a stable future for our country.

Last edited by Greg in LA; 01-23-2013 at 09:09 AM.
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Old 01-22-2013, 06:43 PM
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Ayatollahgondola Ayatollahgondola is offline
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Originally Posted by Don View Post
I described my own personal experiences, not yours which are unknown to me and for which I'm not authorized to speak in any event. If you had different experiences that are eating away at your insides, go for it. You don't need permission from me. I note that you opted to stay in the US rather than to migrate to Cuba, Mexico or some other place for a "better life." !
Ha! Nothing about that issue during that period is eating away my insides. I am proud of my anti-war activism, Although in retrospect, there were some activities I took part in that I would not do again if I could do it over. But not many. I vigorously protested the war, and also enlisted in the US Army, but I did so to avoid being drafted and having the war department pick which branch for me. Cuba or mexico was not the destination for draft dodgers though. It was Canada. But no; Evasion wasn't on the table for me.
Point wwas that it was a crazy time too. Real crazy. People thought the US was coming apart then too. Remember? It was all a communist plot to taake over the minds of youth and turn them against Capitalism, truth, justice, and the American way


Quote:
I didn't mean to suggest that the US was an idyllic utopia in the 50's and 60's. It was not always a bed of roses for me, either.

I wrote an op-ed for my college newspaper the Black Student Union didn't like. They came to the newspaper office to attack me, trashed the place and beat up a white liberal whose bad luck was to be there instead of me. I guess we all look alike to them.

The liberal they beat up hated me. Is it not poetic justice that he got his ass kicked for something I wrote?

In the aftermath, I was called to the office of the College President to discuss this event. He asked me to "moderate" my writing style. I asked if any of the perpetrators would be prosecuted? He said, " Probably not. We must not over react!"
Now here I'll agree with you somewhat. There was a strong effort to swing the pendulum the other way on Black mistreatment. Unfortunately it was a misbegotten one. Instead of creating real equality, there was this detente type things going, where if a black student, or a group of them, mistreated a white student...or a group of them, then those white students complaints were dismissed, in the hopes everything would die down and everybody would go back to their desks and put their heads into their books. In theory it was wobbly. In practice it had a profoundly opposite effect. White student then reviled both the black students for getting away with infractions or even violence, and black students became emboldened and began flexing their muscles even more. Even a half-breed like me was considered a honkey, and what few black friends I started out in school with quickly evaporated into one or two, one of which was not to be counted on if he was in the company of his "brothers". It couldn't have been too much worse of a strategy really, not just for us students, but for some of the teachers who also came to some harm when muscle flexing became muscle using.

But a lot of those black kids made it through, as did I and other white kids. I can't place the blame on all black kids/people though. It was the blasted establishment that caused us all to turn on one another. Sure there were alot of bad black students, but I'll say without reservation that overall, Black families have suffered a growth problem because their culture was crippled by slavery, and it takes a few centuries to set things right. the trouble is, once again, our government establishment is getting in the way with their own nefarious schemes, and it is unlikely to help...much
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Old 01-23-2013, 07:23 PM
Greg in LA Greg in LA is offline
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Ayatollah, you're making a good point about the craziness in America during Vietnam and the riots after the ML King shooting.
Yes those definitely qualify as crazy times in America.
Those events in my opinion led to a lot of the problems that we are fighting today.

How about the huge ethnic shift that has gone on in America in the last several decades, I would group attitudes to massive immigration in America into four view points:

Group 1: These people ignore every bit of it, it means nothing to them. If there is a problem they just move to a different suburb or city. They're only involved with their own day to day activities.

Group 2: These people are aware of the transition, but just keep smiling like it's all fine. Privately they may acknowledge some uneasiness, but wouldn't dare say anything publicly. Overall they would rank immigration problems as a distant 5th place on their list of priorities.

Group 3: Are very scared about the transformation, and it's very easy for them to envision disastrous consequences because of the immigration transformation and lawlessness.

Group 4: Is the immigrant groups, Mostly Hispanic who lust for more and more immigration, as they benefit from it personally, many in this group probably have a real resentment against White Americans. I would also add to this group Americans on the far left (ultra socialists, Communist, Black and Hispanic separatists), who are actively anti American, and particularly anti White.

I would put Group 1: the totally clueless and unconcerned portion of the country, at 35% of the country.

I would put group 2, the group that is privately somewhat aware of the immigration problems, but wouldn't dare say anything publicly, at 30% of the country.

Group 3, The side that is scared and aware (that would be us), I would put at 20%.

Group 4: Totally unassimilated immigrants, and far left Americans (Socialists/Marxists), I would put at 15%.

Those are my own estimates. I have know idea if I'm right, but I would be very curious to see what ratio people here think we have.

Last edited by Greg in LA; 01-23-2013 at 07:27 PM.
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Old 01-23-2013, 07:57 PM
Greg in LA Greg in LA is offline
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So according to my estimate:

15% of the country's population loves open borders.

80% of the country will not lift a finger or say a word against massive immigration, amnesty or open borders.

20% of the country stopped the amnesties in 2006-2012.

The hard core patriots fighting the invasion are only 5% more than the hard core amnesty lovers.

65% of the country is apathetic about the issue.

30% of the country is aware of the problem, but is either so polite or so frightened of being called "racist" they wouldn't dare say anything.


When I analyze these figures, If their proportions are correct I would really describe our country as mostly apathetic, and only slightly more patriotic than anti American.

Last edited by Greg in LA; 01-23-2013 at 08:07 PM.
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Old 01-24-2013, 11:48 AM
Don Don is offline
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I can't place the blame on all black kids/people though. It was the blasted establishment that caused us all to turn on one another. Sure there were alot of bad black students, but I'll say without reservation that overall, Black families have suffered a growth problem because their culture was crippled by slavery, and it takes a few centuries to set things right. the trouble is, once again, our government establishment is getting in the way with their own nefarious schemes, and it is unlikely to help...much
Thanks for admitting that:

(1) Whites have been relegated to 2nd class status; and,

(2) Blacks are not responsible for their actions.

Interesting theory of yours, that it takes a "few centuries to set things right" after slavery, that was ended 150 years ago. If it takes centuries for blacks to perform to the same ethical and intellectual standards as whites, as you argue, shouldn't under performing blacks be banned from life threatening occupations like practicing medicine, flying commercial airplanes, doing brain surgery, owning guns or making decisions about the use of nuclear weapons...at least for a "few centuries" and they finally recover from "slavery" and achieve the same level of accountability as whites?

And shouldn't vulnerable white children be separated from blacks who, for whatever reason, can't control their impulse for racially motivated anti-white violence?

Were not southern whites morally correct to use racially segregated schools to protect vulnerable white children from racially motivated violence by blacks, who are given a pass for violence because it is "not fair" to hold them to the same high standards as white children whom they brutalize?

How nice when people like you come around and agree that the southern white assessment of negro character and impulse control was correct all along. Whether you realize it or not, you've made a case for an anti-white racial caste system as well as for black inferiority.

I'm called a racist because I think blacks should be held to the same standards as whites, but you're regarded as "enlightened", "accepting" and "tolerant" based on your belief that blacks are not capable of meeting the same standards as whites. I'm sure black people are flattered by your high assessment of their intelligence and character and your belief that they'll act like savages for at least the next "few centuries."

So nice when people like you rip off the mask and show your true beliefs.
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